PCOS myths debunked. Facts you should know about PCOS.

7 PCOS Myths Debunked - Facts Nobody Tells You About PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome, or PCOS, is a hormonal disorder in women of reproductive age. It is the most common endocrine disorder in women, affecting between 5 and 10 percent of all women. Despite being so common, PCOS is often misunderstood. This can lead to many myths and misconceptions about the disorder. In this article, we will debunk some of the most common PCOS myths.

 

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Myth #1 – If you are overweight, you’ve PCOS

It is a common misconception that if someone is overweight, she automatically have PCOS. There is no scientific evidence to suggest that being overweight automatically equates to having PCOS. In fact, many women who are overweight do not have PCOS, and many women with PCOS are of a healthy weight. PCOS is a complex condition that can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, lifestyle and environmental factors. Being overweight can increase the risk of developing PCOS, but it is not the only factor that contributes to the condition. Some other contributing factors include hormone imbalance, insulin resistance and high levels of androgens (male hormones). Being overweight does not mean you have PCOS, and being thin or lean does not mean you do not have PCOS.

Being overweight can also increase the risk for other health problems, such as heart disease and diabetes. So while there is a link between PCOS and obesity, it is not always the case. If you are concerned about your weight or suspect that you may have PCOS, it is important to see a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

 

Myth #2: If you don’t have polycystic ovaries, you don’t have PCOS

Despite the name, polycystic ovaries are not essential for a diagnosis of PCOS. In fact, up to 70% of women with PCOS do not have polycystic ovaries.

However, while the presence of polycystic ovaries is one criterion for diagnosing PCOS, it is not the only one. Other criteria include menstrual irregularities, and androgen excess. So even if you don’t have polycystic ovaries, you may still have PCOS if you meet other diagnostic criteria.

So if you don’t have polycystic ovaries, you don’t have PCOS? Not necessarily! If you are experiencing any of the other common symptoms of PCOS, it’s worth talking to your doctor about getting tested for the condition.

PCOS is characterized by menstrual irregularities, hirsutism, obesity, and androgen excess. While it is typically diagnosed by the presence of polycystic ovaries on ultrasound, up to 70% of women with PCOS do not have polycystic ovaries. This has led to the myth that if you don’t have polycystic ovaries, you don’t have PCOS.

 

Myth #3: You can never get pregnant if you have PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that can cause problems with a woman's ovaries. PCOS often results in missed or irregular periods, which can make it difficult for a woman to become pregnant. However, women with PCOS can still get pregnant, and there are many ways to increase the chances of becoming pregnant.

Some women may think that they cannot get pregnant if they have PCOS, but this is not always true. PCOS is just one of the many factors that can affect fertility. There are many treatments available for PCOS, and most women with PCOS can still conceive naturally or with help from fertility treatments.

There are many myths about pregnancy, and it is important to debunk these myths so that people can make informed decisions about their health. Pregnancy is a beautiful, life-changing experience, but it is also a huge responsibility. It is important to be aware of all the facts before trying to conceive.

One cannot deny that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can affect a woman's ability to get pregnant. However, it is not impossible to become pregnant with PCOS. PCOS is caused by an imbalance of hormones in the body, which can lead to problems with ovulation. This means that the ovaries may not release an egg each month, making it difficult for a woman to get pregnant. However, with proper treatment, many women with PCOS are able to conceive naturally. Treatment options for PCOS include lifestyle changes, medications, and in some cases, surgery. If you are having difficulty getting pregnant and have been diagnosed with PCOS, be sure to talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you.

 

Myth #4: You can only get PCOS if it runs in your family

Many women have PCOS symptoms, but they are not ready to accept it. This is because they believe they cannot have PCOS because it does not run in their respective families.

It is true that you are at a greater risk of developing PCOS, when there is a history PCOS in the family. But that does not guarantee you won't have PCOS if there is not family history.

Many people believe that you can only get PCOS if it runs in your family. However, this is not always true. While PCOS does tend to run in families, it is not an inherited condition. PCOS can develop in any woman, regardless of her family history. Some women may be more likely to develop PCOS if other women in their family have had it, but it is not guaranteed that a woman will develop PCOS just because her mother or sisters have it.

Researchers believe that there may be a genetic component to PCOS, meaning that some women are more likely to develop PCOS than others. However, there is no one gene that has been identified as causing PCOS. Rather, it is likely that a combination of genes and environmental factors contribute to the development of PCOS.

So, while genetics may play a role in the development of PCOS, there are many other factors that can also contribute to its onset. Anyone can develop PCOS, regardless of whether or not it runs in their family.

 

Myth #5: All women with PCOS have irregular periods

Only about 50% of women with PCOS have irregular periods. That means the other half of the women with PCOS have regular periods. 

PCOS is not the only factor causing irregular periods. There are many factors that can contribute to irregular periods. PCOS can be one among them.

Some of the most common causes of irregular periods include changes in hormone levels, stress, diet, and exercise.

PCOS is a disorder that can cause a number of different symptoms, and some women with PCOS do experience irregular periods, while others do not.

So while irregular periods are a common symptom of PCOS, they are not universal.

There are a number of factors that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle, including her age, her health, and her lifestyle. So it is not necessarily accurate to say that all women with PCOS will have irregular periods. In fact, some women with PCOS may actually have very regular periods. Likewise, some women without PCOS may also experience irregular periods.

There are many different symptoms of PCOS, and each woman may experience different symptoms to varying degrees. So it is important to talk to your doctor if you think you may have PCOS, in order to get a proper diagnosis and find the best treatment plan for you.

In order to make a diagnosis of PCOS, a healthcare professional would likely perform other tests, such as a blood test or an ultrasound, to look for other signs of the condition.

 

Myth #6: Birth control pills can reverse PCOS

Now, this one is a dangerous misconception that you can have.

The danger is – you can keep popping the pills and in end the regret to see your PCOS getting worse than ever.

There is no scientific evidence to support the claim that birth control pills can reverse PCOS.

In fact, birth control pills may actually make PCOS worse. Birth control pills work by artificially suppressing ovulation, and altering the hormone levels. For women with PCOS, this can lead to an increased level of testosterone and an irregular menstrual cycle.

Additionally, birth control pills can cause weight gain, which is a common problem for women with PCOS.

Birth control pills are often prescribed as a treatment for PCOS, but they cannot reverse the condition. PCOS is a hormonal disorder that affects the ovaries and can cause problems with menstrual cycles, fertility, and hair growth.

Birth control pills are found to promote insulin resistance. Birth control pills also contain estrogen, which can worsen the symptoms of PCOS.

 

Myth #7: PCOS causes low libido

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that PCOS causes low libido. In fact, some research indicates many women with PCOS report having normal or even high levels of sexual desire. The low libido associated with PCOS may be due to other factors, such as stress or anxiety.

Many women with PCOS report having normal or even high levels of sexual desire.

There are many factors that can affect libido, including stress, relationship issues, and medications. If you are experiencing low libido, it is important to consult with your doctor to identify the underlying cause.

 

Conclusion: PCOS myths debunked

PCOS is a common disorder that can cause a number of different symptoms. While some of these symptoms are well known, such as irregular periods and hair growth on the face or body, others may be less familiar to people who do not have PCOS. In this article, we have debunked seven of the most common myths about PCOS. We hope this information will help you better understand PCOS and its effects on women's health. If you think you may have PCOS, it is important to talk to your doctor so you can get a proper diagnosis and find the best treatment plan for you.

 

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Dr. Sanchita Dharne - Expert homeopathic doctor for PCOS treatment

Dr. Sanchita Dharne is an expert homeopathic doctor for PCOS treatment. She can help you overcome PCOS and its effects on your health. She has years of experience in treating PCOS and has helped many women reverse PCOS and restore vitality. Contact her today to schedule a consultation and learn more about how homeopathy can help you reverse PCOS.

 

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